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Nancy Allbritton was among three researchers in the College of Arts and Sciences named to the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Nancy Allbritton was among three researchers in the College of Arts and Sciences named to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (photo by Lars Sahl)

Six scientists from UNC-Chapel Hill have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society.

The Carolina researchers are among 401 new fellows chosen for the honor, which is bestowed upon association members by their peers in recognition of their distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

The list of fellows appeared in the Nov. 28 issue of Science.

With this announcement, Carolina now boasts 71 fellows among its current faculty. The new honorees – drawn from the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine – and their citations are:

Nancy L. Allbritton (chemistry, biomedical engineering, College of Arts and Sciences): For invention and implementation of new tools for biomedical research and for development of miniaturized devices to enable more accurate disease diagnosis.

Rosann A. Farber: For distinguished contributions to the field of cancer biology, particularly related to DNA mismatch repair and instability mechanisms.

T. Kendall Harden: For distinguished research and service in the field of molecular pharmacology regarding the understanding of receptor, G protein and effector signaling in physiology.

Dale L. Hutchinson (anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences): For distinguished contributions to the study of ancient disease and health, especially in understanding pathogen-host interactions from human remains from archaeological contexts.

Karen L. Mohlke: For distinguished contributions to understanding the genetic basis of diabetes and related traits, particularly the functional characterization of associations.

Nancy L. Thompson (chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences): For distinguished contributions to cell membrane biophysics, particularly the development and application of many novel methods in quantitative fluorescence microscopy.

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