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Terry Ellen Rhodes

Statement on Diversity from Dean Terry Rhodes

The College of Arts & Sciences, the largest school at Carolina, is a place of diverse talents, backgrounds, interests and experiences. This diversity — among our 19,000-plus undergraduate and graduate students and nearly 1,600 faculty and staff — is one of our greatest strengths. We know that when people with diverse backgrounds and perspectives come together, new ways of thinking … Continued


Statement on Diversity from Sabrina Burmeister

Inclusive Excellence in the College of Arts & Sciences means recognizing the importance of diversity and inclusion in meeting our goal of student-focused, scholarly excellence.


Joseph Jordan (photo by Jon Gardiner)

Light, liberty and the promotion of black art, history and culture

Massey Award winner Joseph Jordan embodies the University’s “Lux, Libertas” motto and makes the Stone Center a vital part of campus.


Photo of Old Well with campus seal in the foreground by Donn Young

A Message from Dean Rhodes

This has been a deeply painful and disturbing week for our nation, with the video that has emerged of George Floyd and his horrible death in police custody in Minneapolis.


Cassandra R. Davis will lead a team of researchers in examining the impact of COVID-19 on college persistence among first-generation college students.

Calculating COVID-19’s educational costs

Cassandra R. Davis studies the impact of natural disasters on schools and communities. Now the public policy professor is turning her attention to the impact of another kind of disaster — a global pandemic — on first-generation college students.


Angela Stuesse with Celso Mendoza.

Vulnerable workers, unsafe conditions

There have been more than 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in poultry and other meat processing plants in North Carolina, and over 10,000 cases across the United States. The industry is the subject of UNC-Chapel Hill anthropologist Angela Stuesse’s scholarly work.


Kia Caldwell

Inequality amplifies African Americans’ COVID-19 risk

Recent data shows that minorities are more at risk for contracting COVID-19 and experiencing poor health outcomes. In particular, African Americans in COVID-19 hot spots are twice as likely to die from the virus than their white counterparts.


William Sturkey (photo by Grant Halverson)

Sturkey wins Zócalo Book Prize for “Hattiesburg”

William Sturkey, a historian in UNC’s College of Arts & Sciences, has won the 10th annual Zócalo Public Square Book Prize for “Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White.”


coronavirus illustration

Coronavirus update

The University has announced a new plan that will encourage greater “social distancing” and mitigate the spread of coronavirus. Spring break is extended through March 22. Remote instruction for the majority of courses will begin the week of March 23.