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Capturing the Lives of Sea Creatures

May 17, 2022

Liah McPherson records the lives of dolphins and whales — from Hawaiʻi to Antarctica. She’s now a master’s student at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; she graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2019 with a dual degree in biology and animal behavior and a minor in marine science.

Brain-Body Breakthroughs

March 25, 2022

Psychoneuroimmunology. It’s a mouthful, but it’s also a burgeoning field addressing how psychological stress impacts the brain and the body. Keely Muscatell is one of just a few scholars conducting research within this realm.

Research Uncovered: Iheoma U. Iruka

February 14, 2022

Iheoma U. Iruka is a research professor in the Department of Public Policy and founding director of the Equity Research Action Coalition within the FPG Child Development Institute. She studies how to promote the health, wealth, and educational excellence of minoritized children and children from low-income households.

The Smorgasbord Scientist

January 11, 2022

Why do some organisms live in groups? What influences their cooperation with one another? How do they choose their mates? PhD student Brian Lerch has a lot of questions about ecology and evolutionary biology — and he strives to answer them using math.

Research UNCovered: Nihar Vaidya

September 1, 2021

Nihar Vaidya is a Chancellor’s Science Scholar who uses computational neural networks to analyze brain patterns found in MRI data sets to predict when patients may encounter seizures caused by epilepsy.

Unearthing the Planet’s History

February 15, 2021

How did the planet become what it is today? UNC geochemist Xiao-Ming Liu collects samples of soil, rocks, and water from places like Hawaii to find the answer.

Tiny molecules, big potential

January 14, 2021

North Carolina native and organic chemist Sidney Wilkerson-Hill is investigating ways to recreate the power of plants in the lab — work that could lead to advances in drug development.

Cooperation over competition

January 7, 2021

Flocks of birds. Schools of fish. Colonies of ants. Their strength is in numbers as they can fend off larger predators, move faster, and mate more easily. Daphne Klotsa, an applied physicist, studies how these biological swarms function in hopes to improve how humans and automated technologies navigate the world.

Hettleman Award winner Andrea Bohlman

October 16, 2020

Andrea Bohlman is an associate professor in the Department of Music and a recipient of the 2020 Hettleman Award for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement.

Hettleman Award winner William Sturkey

October 16, 2020

William Sturkey is an associate professor in the Department of History and a recipient of the 2020 Hettleman Award for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement.