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Photo of the new office building in Chapel Hill

Honoring Gwendolyn Harrison Smith

The first African American woman to enroll at UNC-Chapel Hill is being honored with a named scholarship fund, thanks to a $100,000 gift from Grubb Properties.


Thomas Wadden (second from right, standing) in a 1976 class photo.

New gift marks the importance of support for clinical psychology graduate students

As the No. 2 ranked clinical psychology graduate program (U.S. News and World Report, 2020), UNC’s department of psychology and neuroscience has a long history of faculty fostering strong working relationships with students. In the late 1970s, one such student was Thomas Wadden (Ph.D. clinical psychology ’81), a native of Washington, D.C.


Roberts-Watson Family Support New Environmental Scholars Program

The newly formed department of earth, marine and environmental sciences received a vote of confidence from College alumni Jennifer Watson Roberts ’82 and Manley Roberts ’80, who have created the Roberts-Watson Family Environmental Scholars Program.


A blessed life: Cliff Huang and his journey from Taiwan to UNC

In a story seemingly made-for-TV, Cliff Huang, Ph.D. ’68, weaves a tale that is truly rags to (academic) riches. It’s a story that led him to recently make a $1.5 million gift to support graduate students in the department of economics.


Carolina Blue Honors Fellowship to Reach More Students

The Carolina Blue Honors Fellowship has been expanded to reach more UNC students with additional funding from Ricky May. This will build on the Carolina Blue Fellowship’s momentum pre-COVID-19 and will ensure the long-term success of the program. 


Standing, left to right: Jason P. Mihalik, co-director, Matthew Gfeller Center; Terry Rhodes, dean, College of Arts & Sciences; James Kelly, executive director, Marcus Institute for Brain Health; Kevin Guskiewicz, chancellor. (photo by Jeyhoun Allebaugh)

New clinical outreach program will treat traumatic brain injury in veterans

A $12.5 million gift from the Gary Sinise Foundation Avalon Network will establish the THRIVE Program in the College of Arts & Sciences’ Matthew Gfeller Center.


From left, graduate student Christine Mikeska and associate professor Benjamin Arbuckle pose in an archaeology lab. They are wearing masks.

Analyzing ancient animal remains

Associate professor Benjamin Arbuckle and graduate student Christine Mikeska are examining remains of animal teeth excavated from two Bronze Age cities — Hattusa and Tell Bderi — to explore fundamental questions about how these early urban centers supported populations of several thousand people.


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