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Bookmark This

July 2, 2020

Bookmark This is a feature that highlights new books by College of Arts & Sciences faculty and alumni. This month’s book: “Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife” by Bart D. Ehrman.

How to have a better day during the pandemic

June 30, 2020

Passively browsing social media is not good for you — and other useful findings on resilience and happiness from the ​Positive Emotions and Psychophysiology Lab.

The story of North Carolina’s Rocky Mount Mills

June 29, 2020

UNC’s Community Histories Workshop has developed Digital Rocky Mount Mills, a website with resources and information for those interested in the mill’s history, the North Carolina textile industry, K-12 pedagogy, African American genealogy, oral history and memory, historic preservation and economic development.

Seafood mislabeling in North Carolina

June 25, 2020

Two recent student-led papers based on research in the undergraduate “Seafood Forensics” class at UNC-Chapel Hill show that seafood mislabeling in North Carolina is a big problem.

Crescendos of Creativity

June 22, 2020

As the director of UNC Opera, Marc Callahan teaches his students and audiences that this age-old art form offers so much more than singing on a stage: It’s a craft that requires creative research and a team of people to bring it to life.

Improvisation leads to successful Summer Jazz Workshop

June 19, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded, faculty members in Carolina’s music department had to do a new kind of musical improvisation: move the annual, in-person Summer Jazz Workshop for students and amateur musicians entirely online.

An Active Storm Season

June 19, 2020

June 1 marked the start of the 2020 hurricane season — and it’s slated to be an active one. In this Q&A, UNC researcher Rick Luettich talks about this year’s above-average hurricane forecast.

For the Love of Language

June 19, 2020

Since 1984, over 100,000 Karen refugees have fled their homeland of Myanmar to escape civil war. Linguistics PhD students Amy Reynolds and Jen Boehm strive to understand this shift and hope to preserve the Karen people’s histories in the process.