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View a list of departments in natural sciences & mathematics.

 

Closeup of a hand in a glove with tweezers working on a device surrounded by biomedical equipment.

Collaborating for breakthroughs

The Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at Carolina and NC State leverages the best of both universities to create a unique program for students.


Koji Sode and students sit at a table eating.

Koji Sode on the value of global research collaboration

Every year, Koji Sode, William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering, hosts graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from Japan and Korea at his research lab on UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus.


Isabel Romero stands in a body of water with her equipment.

Algal Rhythms

Isabel Silva-Romero studies how ocean temperatures affect the food web on rocky reefs around the Galápagos Islands.


Photo of Adult C. elegans gonad expressing fluorescent proteins in the distal tip cell (yellow) and somatic gonad sheath cells (cyan).

Mapping the cellular landscape

By investigating the behavior of stem cells in a microscopic worm, Kacy Gordon’s lab hopes to produce useful knowledge at larger scales of biological complexity.


Allen Wood stands in a laboratory.

From research to application: Interning at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Allen Wood, who is pursuing a Ph.D. in materials science, spent his summer as an intern at Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, working on 3D printing plastic scintillators for use as radiation detectors.


Carl Rodriguez stands in front of a chalkboard with writing on it.

Physicist Carl Rodriguez receives 2022 Packard Fellowship

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation has announced that Carl Rodriguez, who will join UNC’s department of physics and astronomy in January 2023, is one of 20 recipients of the 2022 Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering.


The backs of a line of children playing outside on the grass, dressed in warm weather attire.

Early deprivation continues to affect brain development well into adolescence

A new study published on Oct. 7 in Science Advances shows that early deprivation continues to affect brain development well into adolescence. “We know … that experiences early in life shape brain development but until now, this has never been shown conclusively in humans,” says Margaret Sheridan, a clinical psychologist at UNC-Chapel Hill.